Saving Money Better – Focus on the Big Wins First

A lot of people set resolutions to save more money. In fact, it was the third most popular resolution for 2015, behind only “lose weight” and “get organized.” But as we’ve noted before, only 8% of people successfully achieved their resolutions. So how do we go about making sure that we are the select few who actually do save more money?

Do you focus on the Latte Factor and cut out your daily coffee? Do you drive around in search of the best deals or spend your Sundays clipping coupons?

I would argue that if you want to save the most money, you need to first look at the areas where you spend the most money. Continue reading “Saving Money Better – Focus on the Big Wins First”

Your Instinctive Thinking Is Losing You Money

Imagine for a moment that you are in the market for a new suit. You find one that you like for $200. A fellow customer then tells you that the same exact suit is on sale across town for only $100. Do you go?

Imagine that you are buying a new car. You’ve done your test drives and made a final decision on which make and model you want. You go to the dealer near your home to find that the car costs $30,000. A salesman sees you eyeing the car and says, “My manager would kill me for saying this, but the dealer on the other side of town has this model for $29,900.” Do you go? Continue reading “Your Instinctive Thinking Is Losing You Money”

Why Have Houses Gotten More Expensive?

Today I want to revisit the world of housing. As an (almost) 30-something, buying a house is something that I have spent significant time thinking about. If my Facebook feed is any indication, then I am not alone in this.

Specifically, I want to explore the idea that it was more affordable for our parents to buy houses. Is this actually true? And if so, how does it square with the (previously-discussed) fact that the value of your house generally only grows at the rate of inflation? Continue reading “Why Have Houses Gotten More Expensive?”

Your Emergency Fund

Everybody knows that they need an emergency fund (despite the fact that not enough people have them). Nobody wants the stress of being unable to handle a medical emergency, the loss of a job, or a car that needs repairs. But what priority level should your emergency fund be compared to paying off debt or saving for retirement? How much do you actually need to save? And should it be in all cash or invested? These are the issues we’ll be looking at today.

When to Start Saving

The loudest voice in personal finance is Dave Ramsey. Ramsey tells his readers and listeners to first save $1,000 in an emergency fund, then pay off all non-mortgage debt, then build the emergency fund to 3-6 months of expenses. And all of this before contributing anything to retirement savings.

If you’ve been around here for any length of time, you know from my framing of the last paragraph that I am about to disagree. Continue reading “Your Emergency Fund”

Pay Yourself First

Sometimes I will read the same piece of advice across a dozen personal finance books and a host of personal finance blogs. My brain will automatically start pushing that to the back of my mind as common knowledge.

And then, sometime later, I will be interacting with someone in the real world and remember that it is not common knowledge. I will remember that I am a weirdo and normal people don’t spend their time reading personal finance books for fun.

One such piece of advice is to pay yourself first. Continue reading “Pay Yourself First”