Politics and Your Wallet – Warren’s Wealth Tax

In case you hadn’t noticed, there’s a race for president that’s been going on in the United States. For the past 14 months. That will last another 9 months.

Sigh.

With that in mind, we’ve been spending time exploring the intersection of politics and personal finance. If we’re going to be figuring out which candidates to vote for then we might as well learn how their proposed policies would affect our wallets.

We’ve already looked into Kamala Harris’s LIFT Act and Cory Booker’s baby bonds proposal. (Both have since ended their campaigns but, as I noted in those articles, they are still members of the United States Senate and will presumably continue to push their respective plans.

Today we’re going to look at something a bit more complicated: Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax plan. Continue reading “Politics and Your Wallet – Warren’s Wealth Tax”

Politics and Your Wallet – Baby Bonds

While many writers in the personal finance community shy away from politics, we should instead be spending more time understanding and explaining politics to our readers. The decisions that politicians make directly impact our lives, so it is important to understand what politicians stand for and what they will do if elected.

Understanding politics gives you the power to advocate for politicians and policies that will improve your life and the lives of those around you.

With our Politics and Your Wallet series, we’re working on looking at different economic policy proposals and how they will affect you. Our last investigation was into Kamala Harris’s LIFT Act, which would send monthly checks to 80 million Americans.

Today, we’ll be looking at Cory Booker’s “baby bonds” plan, which would fund an investment account for every child in the United States.

Even if Booker does not win the presidency, he will still be in the Senate and will keep advocating for this plan. It has even recently picked up a champion in the House in Ayanna Pressley. So while Booker’s prospects in the primary look remote at this point, this policy is still worth a closer look. Continue reading “Politics and Your Wallet – Baby Bonds”

Introduction to Investing and Economics

Of the first seven months of the year, only two dealt with money. In February we learned about the basics of personal finance and in May we dove into the intersection of money and happiness.

The rest of the year had been spent on topics like life planning, productivity and time management, health, the science of happiness, and the philosophy of happiness.

In August we made our triumphant return to money with an exploration of investing and economics. Continue reading “Introduction to Investing and Economics”

Personal Finance 101

Today we’re continuing the journey we started last week traveling through the different subjects that we’ve covered this year.

Last week we took a big picture look at life planning, which was our topic for January.

Today, we’re diving into our February research, which was on personal finance basics. Continue reading “Personal Finance 101”

Answering UBI Questions and Concerns (Universal Basic Income Part 3)

Last week we started our deep dive into Universal Basic Income.

First we learned what UBI actually is and what the different visions for it entail. Then we dove into the research to learn that giving people money works.

Today we’re going to tackle a whole range of other questions and concerns that people have about UBI.

(Today’s post is going to reference information we learned in the last two posts, so if you feel like you’re missing something, feel free to double back and catch up!) Continue reading “Answering UBI Questions and Concerns (Universal Basic Income Part 3)”

Loan Forgiveness (or Why Dave Ramsey Doesn’t Know What He’s Talking About)

“Oh! You’re the student loan tweet guy!”

This is a response that I heard a lot while introducing myself to people recently at FinCon, a conference for money writers and podcasters. It’s a strange thing to be known for after spending two and a half years writing about finances without ever really touching on the topic.

That said, the tweet led to a lot of interesting conversations, both in person and on Twitter, about student loans. In particular, a lot of people were very interested in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program in which I am participating.

Some people objected to the program on financial grounds, but many raised political or policy issues.

Because of this, I thought that the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program would be a topic worth exploring during our month of politics. Continue reading “Loan Forgiveness (or Why Dave Ramsey Doesn’t Know What He’s Talking About)”

Recession-Proof Yourself

In our exploration of investing and the economy, we’ve touched on a few more pessimistic topics.

We explored how the value of work is declining and how good jobs are disappearing. It’s important to face these facts with a clear, unbiased view so that we can prepare ourselves and avoid being left behind.

This is also true in assessing whether a recession is coming.

Based on historical trends, we are overdue for a recession. On top of that, we’re in the midst of a trade war that some economists think could push us into a recession.

Whether you agree with that assessment or not, it is important to make sure that you are prepared for a recession so that if and when one does hit, you don’t lose your financial footing. Continue reading “Recession-Proof Yourself”

Your House is Not an Investment

We’ve been spending the month exploring economics and investing.

Not once in any of that exploration have I mentioned housing. Even when discussing what we should be investing in.

Why? Did I forget to include it? Isn’t buying a house a great investment?

In short: No. Continue reading “Your House is Not an Investment”

How to Start Investing

By now you may be convinced that you need to be investing

You’ve seen the numbers, you’re convinced of the declining value of work, and you are aware of the rough job markets ahead.

But what should we do about it?

Now may be a good time to get into some more practical advice, so today we’re exploring how to get started with investing. Continue reading “How to Start Investing”