Hard Work Doesn’t Pay (Why I Save So Much, Part 2)

On Tuesday I started trying to explain why I save and invest such a high percentage of my income at such a (relatively) young age.

In that post, we spent some time exploring how a high savings rate can buy you options and can free up how you spend your time in the future. It was an optimistic and positive pitch for saving.

Today will be a bit less optimistic. And less positive. It will be about a sad truth of our modern economy.

Hard work doesn’t pay.

At least, not as much as it used to. Continue reading “Hard Work Doesn’t Pay (Why I Save So Much, Part 2)”

An Obligation to Work?

The United States Congress has a new member this week. 

After losing the race for governor of Montana in November, Greg Gianforte turned around and won a special election to fill Montana’s one seat in the House of Representatives.

Most people are talking about how he won his seat despite body slamming a reporter the night before the election.

Instead, I want to talk about his views on Social Security and retirement.

(And yes, I recognize that only a personal finance blog can be interested in retirement policies while a politician is beating up the press. But we’re all nerds here, and we’re okay with it.) Continue reading “An Obligation to Work?”

Make Space to Be Wrong

Last week I attended an event hosted by the news organization Vox.

The event was a two-day nerd-fest of talking about policy called Vox Conversations. The goal was to get a bunch of policymakers, organization leaders, and nerdy wonks together to talk about policy in the Trump era. Continue reading “Make Space to Be Wrong”

Politics and the Things We Can Control

Last week we talked about the Serenity Prayer and the importance of being able to let go of things that are outside of your control. Today, we’re going to talk about why this is not an excuse for tuning out politics.

It is quite popular in the personal finance community to argue that we should be disengaged from politics. That elections don’t really matter. That we shouldn’t be wasting our time investing in candidates or caring about elections.


This was an especially prevalent topic this past November. The whole world seemed to be hanging on every word out of the candidates’ mouths, and the personal finance blogosphere was having none of it.

Today I want to present a different view.

Elections matter. Government matters. Politics matters. And we need to do the things that are within our power to influence these things to the best of our ability.

Continue reading “Politics and the Things We Can Control”

Dealing with Disappointment

There has been a lot of ink spilled discussing the results of the recent presidential election here in the States. I’m going to add to it today.

You can relax, though, because I will not be talking about politics directly.

Instead, I want to talk about dealing with loss and disappointment. Continue reading “Dealing with Disappointment”