Drink More Water for a More Productive Day

This week we’re looking at simple ways to increase your productivity. These are tips that are easy to overlook, but that should not be underestimated.

On Tuesday we explored the power of writing everything down.

Today, we’re going even simpler. Drink more water.

Continue reading “Drink More Water for a More Productive Day”

The One Key to Optimizing Your Productivity

I spend a good deal of time around here talking about productivity. This is because I spend a good deal of my time elsewhere trying to figure out how to optimize my productivity.

Optimizing productivity is one way to help optimize your life. If you can be more productive during your working hours, you can make more money and save more time that you can spend on other endeavors or with your family and friends.

The key to all of my productivity hacks and tricks all centers on one cornerstone:

Write. Everything. Down.

This may seem overly simplistic or obvious, but don’t underestimate it! Continue reading “The One Key to Optimizing Your Productivity”

Why We Are More Productive When Our Schedules Are Full

On leaving high school, I made an interesting observation: My grades were higher when my schedule was busier.

It was easy to make the distinction between busy semesters and less busy semesters. You may have guessed based on reading around here for a bit that I’m a nerd. Befitting that, I was in the marching band in high school.

A marching band that was regularly the number one band in New England.

For those of you who have not been in a competitive marching band, it is very time consuming.

We practiced for three hours after school two days a week and practiced all day on Saturday.

Once competition season started, we would bus out to competitions on Saturday and Sunday each week.

That’s a lot of hours.

Continue reading “Why We Are More Productive When Our Schedules Are Full”

As Happy as an Old Person

As I’ve noted before, I’ve done a lot of reading on happiness. One consistent finding of studies across the spectrum is that older people are happier than the rest of us.

Despite the declining health that accompanies old age, study after study finds that happiness increases into our senior years.

The freedom of childhood is less happy. The health of young adulthood doesn’t compare. The financial stability of middle age doesn’t do it for us.

So what is it about seniors that makes them happy? And what can we learn from them?

Continue reading “As Happy as an Old Person”

Brace Yourself for the Next Recession

There has been a lot of talk of recession lately.

Based on historical trends, we are overdue for a recession. Add in the fact that the President of the United States is considering starting trade wars over his advisers’ objections, and it becomes even more likely, according to economists. Continue reading “Brace Yourself for the Next Recession”

Is It Worth It? (Why I Save So Much, Part 4)

Over the last couple weeks I’ve run through a lot of my philosophy behind saving and investing. I discussed that I invest at least as much as I spend every month because I want to buy options for my life, because I see the value of labor declining over time, and because I don’t want to need to start a new career path if mine gets automated out of existence.

The big question for most people at this point is: “Is it worth it?” Continue reading “Is It Worth It? (Why I Save So Much, Part 4)”

The Onslaught of Automation (Why I Save So Much, Part 3)

beep boop beep boop
Is this guy coming for your job?

Today we’re back talking about why I save such a high percentage of my income.

Last week we talked about buying options and how hard work is paying less and less over time.

One of the reasons that we are being paid less for our labor is the increasing reliance by companies on automation. This increased automation is a serious enough concern that it gets its own article today. Continue reading “The Onslaught of Automation (Why I Save So Much, Part 3)”

Hard Work Doesn’t Pay (Why I Save So Much, Part 2)

On Tuesday I started trying to explain why I save and invest such a high percentage of my income at such a (relatively) young age.

In that post, we spent some time exploring how a high savings rate can buy you options and can free up how you spend your time in the future. It was an optimistic and positive pitch for saving.

Today will be a bit less optimistic. And less positive. It will be about a sad truth of our modern economy.

Hard work doesn’t pay.

At least, not as much as it used to. Continue reading “Hard Work Doesn’t Pay (Why I Save So Much, Part 2)”

Why I Save So Much

I save and invest a lot. I track my spending and investing and have a goal of investing (between retirement accounts, health savings accounts, and taxable accounts) more each month than I spend. I have successfully hit this goal every month for the last three and a half years.

I recognize that this is unusual.

I have spent a good deal of time preparing taxes for folks in a pretty well-off area, and I am aware that most people don’t save like this. It is especially unusual for young people. Continue reading “Why I Save So Much”

Platinum Cards and Status Symbols

You may have noticed that I have a strong interest in politics. Because of this I listen to a lot of political and policy-related podcasts.

One of those podcasts recently covered a topic that I found quite relevant to the personal finance and financial independence space. Continue reading “Platinum Cards and Status Symbols”